Tagged: education

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Don’t Kid Yourself: We all pay for the defunding of higher education

a guest post by Erika Shaker. I went to McGill in the late 80s and early 90s when tuition fees were less than $1,200 a year, so with summer jobs and some parental help I graduated from my first degree debt-free. For my MA, which I took in Ontario, I worked part-time and graduated after one year with a debt of $10,000. By way of comparison: my partner went to university in Ontario after grants were eliminated, and when the first round of tuition fee hikes were implemented. He completed a BA and then an MA, and graduated with a...

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Africa, Canadian Mining Interests, Human Cargo and Re-education

[Montréal, Québec, Canada  18°C] Last night, I watched the five last episodes of the 2004 six-part television series, Human Cargo, directed by Brad Turner. I watched it on DVD borrowed from the well-stocked video library at La Grande Bibliothèque. The winner of seven Gemini Awards, including best director and best miniseries, the series follows parallel stories and characters closely related to human migration issues. The series is set mostly in Vancouver, where migrants seeking refugee status in Canada deal with the Immigration and Refugee Board’s (IRB) corruptibility, and in Burundi where a civil war between Tutsis and Hutus, exacerbated by...

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Mine Risk Education West of Juba

[Juba, Southern Sudan 34ºC] It’s my first day in Juba (Feb 26) and I start working right away. From Juba, I have a “story from the field” to write about Mine Risk Education (MRE). I’m picked up for a briefing meeting at the UNICEF offices. You can’t get in without a badge or an escort and the metal detector offers the only gateway to the inner compound. We are seven around the table. I’m surrounded by Child Protection Specialists, Mine Risk Educators, Child Protection Officers and Mine Victim Assistant Officers. They all work either for UNICEF or United Nations Mine...

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Schooling Sudanese Refugees in Nairobi at Sud Academy

[Nairobi, Kenya 27°C] Below is a selection of photos taken at Sud Academy, a primary/secondary school for Sudanese refugees in a poor neighbourhood of Nairobi, Kenya. The school has a student population of more than 200 students, some of whom were abducted during the civil war by northern militia and enslaved by them to tend the cattle stolen in the raid. Lino Madut Angok is ne of the abductees who was freed, as indicated in his letter (below) by an organization called Redemption(?). Although I recognize the benefit Lino has received by being freed from bondage, there is much debate (here, here and here) about the practice of redemption (buying the slave’s freedom) and its ability to end slavery in Sudan.